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Thursday, February 2, 2012

book review: the fault in our stars by john green

"The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves, that we are underlings."

Book Review: The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Publisher: Dutton Books


Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.
Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, The Fault in Our Stars is award-winning author John Green’s most ambitious and heartbreaking work yet, brilliantly exploring the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love.

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green. What is this book? A tearjerker, a novel, a hybrid of philosophy and death and happiness and life, a perfection in imperfection, blue, and the truth.

Picking up Green's latest published material, I felt a pang of... sadness? Discomfort? I don't know. I do believe that one of my favorite aspects about Green's books is that he has strong male protagonists that are real. And when I say real, I mean REAL. In a world where very few YA books have this, I rather enjoy it.

But as I started reading "Fault," I was happily amused. It too is about real things, incredible things that make a reader ponder. It's about death and dying and honesty. In the end, it wasn't about the fact that Green was writing from the perspective of a 17-year-old girl, but that, like always, he was writing about the thoughts and actions that create a life (a tragic one, in this case).

That being written, I enjoyed the novel to the nth degree (and that's a lot). Although it seems like Green did struggle with the mindset of a female point of view in the immediate beginning, it did not detract from the story. And just a heads up to John Green fans: don't expect this to be some sappy, lovey-dovey book because it's about cancer and a futile relationship and what not; it's not. It's just not. It has the same wit, flow, and vigor as Green's other books.

The final verdict...

The Fault in Our Stars works not only as an awe-inspiring story of cancer, love, and loss, but as a perfect constellation aligned between its first and last words. John Green outdoes himself again!

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